Administering and Interpreting an Informal Reading Inventory 

Course Title:              LTCY 420

Performance Level:             Level II

Title of Student Performance:  Administering and Interpreting an Informal Reading Inventory 

KY New Teacher Standard(s)

Standard 4:  Assesses and Communicates Learning Results
Standard 8:  Knowledge of Content

Teacher Work Sample Standard(s) Addressed:

·        Contextual Factors: The teacher uses information about the learning-teaching context and student individual addresses to set learning goals, plan instruction and assessment.

·        Design for Instruction: The teacher designs instruction for specific learning goals, student characteristics and needs, and learning contexts.

Disposition Statement (INTASC)

The teacher is committed to using assessment to identify student strengths and promotes student growth rather than to deny students access to learning opportunities.

The teacher is committed to reflection, assessment, and learning as an ongoing process.

Materials:

- A copy of the most recent edition of the Informal Reading Inventory (IRI).

- A video or cassette tape and recorder

Situation:

Teachers in primary classrooms are predominantly responsible for helping their students acquire good literacy skills.  Both in Kentucky and nationwide, the goal is for students to read on grade level by the third grade.  Therefore, teachers need to be able to determine which areas of literacy are areas of strength and which are areas for improvement.  The informal reading inventory is an assessment tool which can aid the primary teacher in determining word knowledge, listening abilities, and independent, instructional, and frustration levels of reading ability.

Product/Task (identified):

Your task is to administer and interpret the Burns and Roe Informal Reading Inventory with one child.  You will be required to:

1) Find a child (1-4),

2) Schedule 1-2 sessions for assessment,

3) Prepare assessment materials appropriate for the child,

4) Administer the word lists, reading passages, and listening passages to the child,

5) Document the child’s performance,

6) Analyze the child’s performance,

7) Prepare a formal report identifying word knowledge level, listening level, independent, instructional, and frustration levels of reading ability, and recommending appropriate instruction,

8) Share the results with either the teacher or parent of the child.

A scoring guide is provided.

Performance Criteria:

1.         The child must be given all subtests (word knowledge, reading levels, and listening level) during 1-2 sessions.

2.         Student should copy protocol sheets needed from the Informal Reading Inventory handbook.

3.         All protocol sheets must be filled out completely and legibly.

4.            Assessment sessions should be recorded on audio or video tape.

5.         Some background information on the child should be included in the formal report.

6.         Also, the conditions of the assessment sessions should be indicated in the report (i.e., where did it take place, distractions, child’s attitude, etc.).

7.         Each area of literacy assessed (word knowledge, three reading levels, and listening level) should be discussed in the formal report both quantitatively and qualitatively.

8.         Specific areas of strength and areas for improvement must be indicated in the formal report.

9.            Instruction addressing the areas for improvement must be included in the formal report.

10.       The formal report, all IRI protocol sheets, and the tape should be turned into the professor.   

Scoring Rubric:

1 - Standard Not Met 2 - Standard Partially 3 - Standard Met
 
4 - Exemplary
 

Some subtests not administered successfully.

Some question exists concerning all subtests being successfully administered.

Word knowledge, reading levels, and listening level successfully administered. 

 

Word knowledge, reading levels, and listening level successfully administered. These objectives were achieved on the first try and without extra assistance.  

Several  omissions exist in protocol sheets; illegible.

Omissions exist in protocol sheets; neatness a problem.

Protocol sheets filled out completely and legibly.

Protocol sheets filled out completely and legibly. These objectives were achieved on the first try and without extra assistance.  

Formal report lacks background information on child.

 

Formal report includes some background information on child.

 

Formal report includes sufficient amount of background information on child.

 

Formal report includes sufficient amount of background information on child.  These objectives were achieved on the first try and without extra assistance.  

 

Formal report lacks details of the conditions of the assessment.

 

Formal report provides a few details of the conditions of the assessment.

 

Formal report provides complete details of the conditions of the assessment.

 

Formal report provides complete details of the conditions of the assessment.  These objectives were achieved on the first try and without extra assistance.  

 

Formal report fails to discuss both quantitative and qualitative information on each area of literacy assessed. 

 

Formal report discusses both quantitative and qualitative information on some of the  areas of literacy assessed. 

 

Formal report discusses both quantitative and qualitative information on each area of literacy assessed. 

 

Formal report discusses both quantitative and qualitative information on each area of literacy assessed.   These objectives were achieved on the first try and without extra assistance.  

 

Formal report fails to indicate areas of strengths and areas for improvement.  

Formal report somewhat indicates areas of strengths and areas for improvement.  

Formal report accurately and thoroughly indicates areas of strengths and areas for improvement.  

Formal report accurately and thoroughly indicates areas of strengths and areas for improvement.  These objectives were achieved on the first try and without extra assistance.  

Recommendations for instruction are not clearly indicated in the formal report.  

Recommendations for instruction are somewhat clearly indicated in the formal report.  

Recommendations for instruction are clearly indicated in the formal report.  

Recommendations for instruction are clearly indicated in the formal report.  These objectives were achieved on the first try and without extra assistance.  

COMMENTS:

 

 

How to Administer an
INFORMAL READING INVENTORY

 

Before the inventory:

1.  Develop rapport with the student. 

2.  The setting in which you administer the IRI should be as quiet and isolated as possible.  Try to speak in a relaxed tone and reassure the child constantly that they are doing great.  Explain that this is not for a “grade” and that they are REALLY helping you by letting you practice with this inventory.  NO child should leave this setting feeling bad or that they have not done well. 

3.  For grades 1 and 2 you should used individual index cards for each of the twenty words on the lists you will need.  The words should be printed in black ink in GOOD manuscript (printing) handwriting.  The words should be large and clear.  You will need to prepare these sets of cards in advance.  Since you don’t know the exact ending level, you should be prepared by having preprimer, primer, first, second, and third word lists on cards.  If you are administering the IRI to a child who the teacher believes is reading above grade level, you can switch to using the word lists in the book after third grade.  Keep each set of cards separate in rubber bands and marked with a small letter on the back of the first card to indicate the level (i.e., pp, p, 1, 2, 3). 

4.  If you are administering the IRI to a child grade 3 or above, you can use the word list in the book.  Provide the student with a cardboard (or stiff board) marker to put under each word as he or she reads it. 

5.  Have all of your copies ready BEFORE you begin your session with the child.  Do NOT ask to make the copies at your school.  You will need student copies of all the word lists you think you will “reasonably need.”  In other words, if you are administering an IRI to a third grade student who the teacher indicates as reading BELOW grade level it would be reasonable that you would need word lists and graded passages for preprimer, primer, first, second, third, and fourth (possible listening level).  You will also need copies of all the “TEACHER” forms that go with those words lists and graded passages.  Copies of all summary sheets will also be needed.

6.  NOTE on selection of child for this practice IRI:   If you have K, 1, or 2 ask you teacher to recommend a child who is at or above grade level (otherwise you may get a child whose frustration level is preprimer and you won’t get much practice administering an IRI).  If you have 3rd or above, you may ask for a child who is at any level.  If a child frustrates at preprimer or primer then you will need to give the IRI to another student.  It takes several administrations before you can trust your results due to administration errors on your part.  The more experience you have with giving multiple levels then the more understanding you will have of exactly how an IRI is administered, scored and used to lead instruction. 

Administering the GRADED WORD LISTS

Explain to the student that they will be reading a list of words.  Tell the child that while they are reading you are going to be making some notes.  You should try to mark your list discretely.  USING A TAPE RECORDED REALLY HELPS so that you don’t have to make lots of notations in front of the child.  Then you can reply the tape as many times as necessary to check for accurate markings.

1.  READ page 14 and 15 numbers 1 through 6.  These passages provide instructions for how to MARK the Word List Scoring Guide (pages 58, 59, 60). 

2.  Start the graded word list at least two years below the student’s grade in school.  IF there is ANY miscue on that list, drop to an easier level and continue to drop to lower levels until there are NO miscues or you are at preprimer level.  (p. 15)

3.  The HIGHEST level word list on which the student makes NO errors is the level at which you should start administering the graded passages. 

4.  You continue asking the child to read the word lists until you have determined the Independent level (0-2 errors), the Instructional level (3-4 errors), and the Frustration level (5+ errors).  You start the graded passages at the level at which NO words were missed.  If words were missed on ALL levels, you start at preprimer. 

 NOTE:  Figure 2-2 on page 14. 

Administering the GRADED PASSAGES

The oral reading sequence should begin on the highest level at which the student achieved a perfect score on the graded word list.  The student should be told, “I want you to read some stories for me.  Some of them will be easy for you; others will be hard.  You are not expected to read everything perfectly.  Just do your best.  If you don’t know a word, try to figure it out instead of skipping it.  After you finish each story, I’m going to ask you some questions about it.” 

1.  Read the introductory statement at the beginning of the first graded passage.  Do not indicate correctness or incorrectness.  If the child pauses briefly and looks at you, say “go on.”  If the child struggles for more than 5 seconds, you should tell them the word and mark TP on the word you gave to the child.  (TP stands for “teacher pronounced”).  p. 16

2.  Use table 2-1 (p. 16) to mark miscues.  Don’t try to analyze or make decisions about these miscues while the child is reading, just mark everything and then figure out later what counts for what.

3.  After the student has finished reading the passage, remove his/her copy and ask the accompanying comprehension questions.  Record any incorrect responses for later analysis. 

4.  If an INDEPENDENT level (word recognition and comprehension) was met at this level, move to the next HIGHER level and repeat the process.  If an independent level was not reached, drop back to the next lower level passage and administer the graded passage at that level.  Continue to drop back to a lower level until the independent level is determined.  NOTE:  You may not be able to determine this with some students … they may not be at the independent level at preprimer. 

5.  Continue moving up or down in levels until independent, instructional, and frustration levels are located.  (chart on page 3)

6.  Both criteria (word recognition and comprehension) must be met to establish the independent and instructional reading levels; in contrast, only ONE of the criteria need to be met to establish the frustration level. 

7.  When a student reaches frustration level, it is appropriate to begin listening comprehension testing.  The examiner should read aloud one section from each successive level (beginning with the SAME level at which the child reached frustration - different version) and ask the student the accompanying comprehension questions.  Progressively higher levels should be administered until the student is unable to answer at least 75 percent of the questions asked.  The highest level at which the student still gives correct answers to at least 75 percent of the comprehension questions is the listening comprehension level.  (p. 20)

NOTE:  Frequently Asked Questions on page 32-34.

Due to time constraints we will not be administering the SILENT reading passages for this assignment. 


Burns, P. and Roe, B. D. (2002).  Informal reading inventory:  Preprimer to twelfth grade, 6th ed. Boston:  Houghton Mifflin Company.  

 

02/13/2007 04:03:56 PM    Hit Counter